Monday, April 13, 2015

PSA: My oldest daughter got phished

My oldest daughter is 24 and lives in Miami, Florida.  She is working a day job and helping a church get started.  Consequently she is always on the go.

She gave me a call this afternoon.  "Dad, I did something really, really dumb.  I got scammed."

Somebody contacted her purporting to be an official who wanted to discuss her student loans.  My daughter, distracted, gave out personal information they should have already had.  Including her Social Security Number.

After a short huddle, we decided that I would do a bit of internet research.  She was in her car driving, so she opted to call her credit card holder/bank and inform them that she had been phished.

The bank put a 90 day hold on her credit...whatever that means.  They advised her to inform the local law authorities.

I found a .gov website that advised the following:
  1. Place a fraud alert with the credit reporting companies.
  2. Get your free credit reports.
  3. Create an Identity Theft Report by filing a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and your local police department.

What to Do Right Away

Immediate Steps to Repair Identity Theft

Here’s how to begin to limit the harm from identity theft.

What to Do Next

Extended Fraud Alerts and Credit Freezes

Placing both extended fraud alerts and credit freezes on your credit reports can make it more difficult for an identity thief to open new accounts in your name.

Repairing Your Credit After Identity Theft

Here are step-by-step instructions for disputing fraudulent charges and accounts related to identity theft.

Lost or Stolen Credit, ATM, and Debit Cards

Federal law limits your liability if your credit, ATM, or debit card is lost or stolen, but your liability may depend on how quickly you report the loss or theft.


  1. Dang... Check the taxes too! If she hasn't already filed, they may try that...

  2. Dang... Check the taxes too! If she hasn't already filed, they may try that...